The Journey to the West, Books 25, 26 and 27

This book contains the full text of the 25th, 26th and 27th stories in our Journey to the West series for people learning to read Chinese. The three stories told here are unchanged from the three original books except for minor editing and reformatting. In Great Peng and His Brothers, the travelers arrive at a tall mountain and must confront three powerful demons: a blue-haired lion, an old yellow-tusked elephant, and a huge terrifying bird.…

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The Dharma Destroying Kingdom (破法王国)

Ignoring a warning from the Bodhisattva Guanyin, Tangseng and his three disciples enter a city whose king has vowed to kill 10,000 Buddhist monks and has already finished off 9,996. The travelers must avoid being killed and figure out how to show the king the error of his ways. Later, the Monkey King Sun Wukong flies over a mountain and sees a large demon with 30 little demons, all blowing fog from their mouths. This…

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The Monk and the Mouse (和尚和老鼠)

In a dark forest the monk Tangseng comes upon a beautiful young woman tied to a tree and half-buried in the ground. The monk frees her, not realizing she is a deadly mouse demon. Later they arrive at a nearby monastery where she devours some monks and tries to force Tangseng to marry her. Sun Wukong learns the truth about her, lodges a complaint with the great Jade Emperor in heaven, and battles the mouse…

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The Thousand Children (一千个孩子)

Tangseng and his disciples arrive at the capital of Bhiksu Kingdom and learn that it’s been renamed “Boytown” because over a thousand little boys have been locked in cages in front of their homes. When they learn what fate awaits these children, Sun Wukong arranges to get them safely out of the city. Then he and the others unravel a plot devised by two demons who, disguised as a Daoist master and his lovely daughter,…

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The Ball of Fire (火球)

A boy is stranded alone on a ship in a storm and receives help from a mysterious magical dwarf. Uses just 358 different Chinese words. Priced at $0.99, but you can download it for free from this website, see “Get a Free eBook” in main menu. Available in eBook only. Believe it or not, it’s possible for you to read and understand this story even if you start off not knowing a single word of…

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