The Three Beautiful Daughters (in Traditional Chinese) (三個漂亮的女兒)

The river-dwelling monster Sha Wujing was once the Curtain Raising Captain, but was banished from heaven by the Yellow Emperor for breaking an extremely valuable cup during a drunken visit to the Peach Festival. Later, the band of pilgrims arrive at a beautiful home seeking a simple vegetarian meal and a place to stay for the night. What they encounter instead is a lovely and wealthy widow and her three even more lovely daughters. This…

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The Hungry Pig (in Traditional Chinese) (很餓的豬)

The pig-man Zhu Bajie becomes Tangseng’s second disciple.  In his previous life, Zhu was the Marshal of the Heavenly Reeds, responsible for the Jade Emperor’s entire navy and 80,000 sailors.  But unable to control his appetites, he got drunk at a festival and attempted to seduce the Goddess of the Moon.  The Jade Emperor banished him to earth, but as he plunged from heaven to earth he ended up in the womb of a sow…

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The Monster of Black Wind Mountain (in Traditional Chinese) (黑風山的妖怪)

The monk Tangseng and his disciple, the short-tempered Monkey King Sun Wukong, begin their multi-year journey to retrieve Buddhist scriptures from Thunderclap Mountain in India.  They first encounter a mysterious river-dwelling dragon, then run into serious trouble while staying in the temple of a 270 year old abbot.  Their troubles deepen when they meet the abbot’s friend, a terrifying black bear monster. This is the 7th book in the best-selling The Journey to the West…

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The Journey Begins (in Traditional Chinese) (西遊開始)

The young monk Xuanzang sets out on his westward journey. His journey is difficult and filled with dangers. He runs into trouble immediately when he is captured and nearly killed by the Monster King and his ogres.  He escapes with the help of a mysterious old man, only to be attacked on the road later by tigers, snakes and more monsters.  Eventually he meets the Monkey King, Sun Wukong. Together they face bandits and wild…

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The Emperor in Hell (in Traditional Chinese) (獄裡的皇帝)

This story starts innocently enough, with two good friends chatting as they walk home after eating and drinking at a local inn.  One of the men, a fisherman, tells his friend about a fortune-teller who advises him on where to find fish.  This seemingly harmless conversation between two minor characters triggers a series of events that eventually cost the life of a supposedly immortal being, and cause the great Tang Emperor himself to be dragged…

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The Young Monk (in Traditional Chinese) (小和尚)

In this book we tell the story of the monk Xuanzang’s birth and early years. Our story begins with the Buddha’s decision to bring his wisdom to China. Then we meet Xuanzang’s father and mother and learn about their terrible ordeals around the time of his birth. Finally we jump ahead to when Xuanzang turns eighteen, learns of his true parentage, and avenges his parents. This is the 4th book in the best-selling The Journey…

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The Immortal Peaches (in Traditional Chinese) (仙桃)

Once again the Monkey King’s unlimited ambitions and uncontrolled appetites land him in deep trouble. He is given a job in heaven taking care of the Emperor’s Garden of Immortal Peaches, but he can’t stop himself from eating all the peaches.  He impersonates a great Immortal and crashes a party in Heaven, stealing the guests’ food and drink and barely escaping to his loyal troop of monkeys back on Earth. And in the end, he…

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Trouble in Heaven (in Traditional Chinese) (天宮裡找麻煩)

Things begin to unravel for Sun Wukong as he sees the consequences of his outrageous actions. While trying to defend his troop of monkeys, he manages to offend the underwater Dragon King, the Dragon Kong’s mother, all ten Kings of the Underworld, and the great Jade Emperor himself. Finally, goaded by a couple of troublemaking demons, he goes too far, calling himself the Great Sage Equal to Heaven and setting events in motion that cause…

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The Rise of the Monkey King (in Traditional Chinese) (猴王的誕生)

This book is a retelling, in easy-to-read Chinese, of the legendary story of how a little stone monkey was born, became king of his troop of monkeys, left his home to pursue enlightenment, received the name Sun Wukong (literally, “ape seeking the void”) from his teacher, and returned home to defend his subjects from a ravenous monster. Sun Wukong, the Handsome Monkey King, is one of the most famous characters in Chinese literature and culture. …

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